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            Airbus

            Testing aircraft components in Merford test cell

            Airbus, one of the largest aircraft builders in the world, asked Merford to develop an acoustic test facility to test aircraft components. Airbus had various technical sound requirements to guide Merford in the construction of the test facility. Various measures, such as the use of sound-insulating doors and sound-absorbing walls, were implemented so that the rooms were fully in line with the requirements.

            Merford supplied and assembled an acoustic test facility for the aircraft builder Airbus to test aircraft components. Airbus set a number of specific requirements in relation to form and acoustic performance:

            • Requested Rw values from 32 dB to more than 85 dB in the higher frequency ranges
            • A very low reverberation time in the dead room

            Merford used the SKS fast-building system to construct the acoustic test facility. This is a single system that can be assembled as a construction kit. For this project, every room was constructed using double walls, with a filled-in cavity and a total wall thickness of around 200 mm, weighing around 75 kg/m².

            The rooms are accessible through interconnected sound-insulating connecting units using Merford's heaviest sound-insulating doors. In addition, each room is fitted with a sound-insulated ventilation unit. Apart from the unprecedented high sound reduction ratings, the shape and the dimensions of the rooms are also remarkable. Due to the sound tests carried out in the rooms, the walls must not be positioned in parallel. This creates a room without any right angles. Of the 4 rooms that have been supplied, 2 are covered with sound-absorbing materials on the inside, thus creating a dead room. Add to this the maximum floor surface area of 85 m² and the maximum height of up to 11 metres, naturally without any steel construction on the inside, and the project's magnitude slowly becomes clear.